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HEADLINE NEWS
  • IEC expects to release election results by Sunday
  • The first result of the 2024 elections has been released from the Bizana Baptist Church in the Eastern Cape
  • With 20 voting districts declared, the ANC still tops the list of votes on the national ballot
  • Gauteng Police say 16 elections-related arrests have been made since the poll date proclamation
  • Counting of ballots continues, albeit slowly, as only 0.57% of Voting Districts have been declared (133 out of 23 293)
  • The majority of voting stations closed late last night due to long queues: IEC
ANC tops list of votes on national ballot after 20 VDs declared

ANC tops list of votes on national ballot after 20 VDs declared

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With 20 voting districts declared, the African National Congress (ANC) still tops the list of votes on the national ballot.

The ANC led after the first district, Bizana Baptist Church, was declared with 99% of votes counted.

It has now reached a total of 2 225 votes, about 57% of the votes counted.

The Democratic Alliance (DA) is now second with 712 votes and the Patriotic Alliance (PA) is third with 345.

These jumps follow the declaration of the first results from the Eastern Cape.

The Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) is fourth nationally with 284 votes.

The first voting district in KwaZulu-Natal has been declared and the new uMkhonto weSizwe Party (MK Party) has won the majority of the votes, now amounting to 176.

Meanwhile, the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) Chairperson Mosotho Moepya has assured the nation that the commission is working hard to ensure that all citizens cast their vote.

Moepya announced that thousands of voters in long queues in some areas of KwaZulu-Natal, Gauteng, the Eastern Cape and Western Cape had been processed after the 9pm deadline through the help of additional staff deployed by the commission.

He thanked citizens for their patience.

“The number as you can see of the stations that are now closing and processing results, in fact counting and processing results, has been increasing at a phenomenal rate. The point we are making is that there is no panic, the work is not happening haphazardly,” he explains.

“The commission is hard at work as we have indicated, we would want to thank you for your patience and understanding we do not take [your patience] for granted,” adds Moepya.

Below is the live stream:

All voters in queues will be allowed to vote: IEC

All voters in queues will be allowed to vote: IEC

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The Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) has assured voters who are still in queues that they will be allowed to vote.

This as polling stations in South Africa’s seventh democratic elections closed at 9pm.

The IEC says 93% of their over 23 000 stations opened on time at 7am this morning.

There were reports of technical glitches and other delays at some stations across the country.

IEC Chief Electoral Officer Sy Mamabolo says they saw very long queues in the metros in Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal, Eastern and Western Cape.

Voter Management Devices

Meanwhile, the IEC says the failure of Voter Management Devices (VMD) at a number of voting stations today has not affected voter’s ability to vote.

Mamabolo addressed the issue of the internet-enabled electoral administrative and management tools which allow amongst other functions, election officials to check voters’ registration information via an online voter’s roll.

He says it is important to take into account the various factors that affect internet connectivity and also bear in mind that a physical voter’s roll is provided to all presiding officers.

“The VMD is an important part of the voting process but it is not a legal requirement. So the legal requirement at the voting station remains the voters roll and all voting stations were provided with the voters roll,” he explains.

“So as soon as we experienced those difficulties, we advised all presiding officers to revert to the voters’ roll which is a legal requirement competent for voting,” adds Mamabolo.

Long queues in Soshanguve

Voters in Soshanguve, north of Pretoria are still waiting patiently in the dark to cast their votes despite power cuts in some sections of the township.

Voting stations experienced delays due to a shortage of scanners and laptops.

Many stations in and around the capital city are still experiencing long queues including Hatfield, where mostly students from the University of Pretoria are waiting to cast their ballot.

It’s going to be a long night for many here at some voting stations in Soshanguve.

While the 9pm cutoff time has passed, the majority of those who have been queuing for hours say they are not leaving until they cast their ballots.

Earlier, tensions rose at Boepathutse Primary School where ballots ran out, delaying the process.

Additional reporting by Phumzile Mlangeni

Below is the media briefing by IEC

IEC reports minimal issues on Day 1 of special voting throughout SA

IEC reports minimal issues on Day 1 of special voting throughout SA

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The Electoral Commission says that it has experienced an insignificant number of challenges on the first day of special voting across the country.

The Commission briefed the media at the National Results Centre in Midrand on Monday as to the special voting process.

The IEC says it was able to open the majority of voting stations in the Eastern Cape in the face of protests which had nothing to do with elections.

It says of the 435 voting stations that experienced problems on Monday morning only 107 remained closed.

IEC updates on special votes:  

‘Ineptness’

Deputy Chief Electoral Officer Masego Shiburi says that the challenges that the IEC faced on the first day of special voting, must be seen in relation to the 22 600 voting stations administered by the Commission.

“While we report a good start to the start of special voting we must regrettably also indicate that there are areas where we are unable to operate not because of ineptness on the part of the Commission but that withstanding all our plans factors external to the electoral programme has meant that in 107 voting stations we have not been able to help voters the majority of voting stations are in the OR Tambo region due to the taxi strike in that area.”

Shiburi says that the IEC is working with the country’s security structures to have the 107 stations open on Tuesday.

Security features

The Commission has also explained the security features it has put in place with regards to special voting.

Shiburi says that the IEC has ensured that no citizen will vote more than once through the use of a special voting application or a Section 24 (A) application.

The Section 24 (A) application, the deadline for which was the 17th of May, allows voters to away from the voting station where they are registered on the 29th of May.

“In an event that a voter applies for a special vote more than once the second transaction will override the initial transaction similarly if a voter applies for a special vote and subsequent votes by section 24 (A), the section 24 (A) approval overrides the special vote that is granted that is in order to honour the constitutional and lawful requirement that a voter must only vote once in an election.”

Shiburi has also outlined the process that will take place after the special votes have been cast.

“The cast special vote will not be counted today they will only be counted with the rest of the ballots at the close of the station on the 29th of May this is so because the same verification that applies to ordinary ballots extends to special votes they will be reintroduced at the stations still in the special envelopes.”

Vote rigging

Meanwhile, the IEC also rejected a claim of vote rigging by the MK Party.

The claim relates to a video on social media showing ballot papers stored in a room at a warehouse in Hammersdale, KwaZulu-Natal which it is alleged was under the control of an unauthorised person in a yellow t-shirt.

The IEC says the video showed the Commission’s planned logistical arrangements and storage of election materials in preparation for special voting on Monday.

Deputy Chief Electoral Officer Mosotho Mosery says law enforcement is looking into the incident.

“The incident on its own is still a matter of processing with ourselves as the commission as well as the police as to whether there will be criminal charges we will know in due course.”

The IEC has warned citizens of misinformation ahead of the second day of special voting and Voting day on Wednesday.

 

Elderly in Mahikeng unable to cast special votes due to ID issue

Elderly in Mahikeng unable to cast special votes due to ID issue

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Senior citizens at Lapa la Botlhe Age Care Centre in Mahikeng, North West, have not been able to cast their special votes after the centre failed to meet the Independent Electoral Commission of South Africa’s (IEC) deadline for applications.

The centre’s representative Susan Kereeditse says one of the challenges was that they only have copies of the IDs of the elderly, while by law, people can only vote with their original IDs.

The IEC is holding special votes on Monday and Tuesday.

“They used to bring us forms. It was then agreed that on the 15th the forms would be released. So we were unable to get the forms because of transport challenges. We only remembered on the 16th that the forms were available on the 15th.

But we also wondered why we had to go get them this time around because they normally bring them to us. Then a gentleman from IEC said he would get back to us. He didn’t explain if it would be telephonically or in another way. But till now he has not communicated with us.”

Eighty-seven-year-old Iris Clack from Modderfontein in Gauteng says she is unsure who registered her for special votes however she is grateful to have voted today away from large crowds.

Clack was called by IEC officials at the Tarentaal Retirement Village in Modderfontein reminding her about her special vote which she was not aware of.

She says her experience was pleasant.

“It went very well. I did ask a lot of questions but I had to be quite sure that I was voting at the right place and everything was stamped and sealed correctly. I didn’t know that I could come today. I didn’t know that I was registered for a special vote because I thought it was just on Wednesday. I don’t know who registered me for a special vote but I did put my name for voting here. I’m glad I wasn’t in a big rush here with a lot of people”

Vote once

Meanwhile, the IEC says it has ensured that no citizen will vote more than once through the use of a special voting application or a Section 24 (A) application. That’s according to Deputy Chief Electoral Officer Masego Shiburi says in the event that a voter applies for a special vote more than once the second transaction will override the initial transaction similarly if a voter applies for a special vote and subsequent votes by section 24 (A).

Section 24 (A) approval overrides the special vote that is granted that is in order to honour the constitutional and lawful requirement that a voter must only vote once in an election.”

2024 Elections | Monitoring special votes with Dr Dale McKinley

DA hopes to ascend into national government via Moonshot Pact

DA hopes to ascend into national government via Moonshot Pact

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The Democratic Alliance (DA) leader John Steenhuisen has urged voters not to miss out on a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to make history by removing the African National Congress (ANC) and electing the DA into government.

Steenhuisen addressed thousands of supporters at the party’s final ‘We can rescue South Africa’ rally in Benoni, east of Johannesburg.

According to Steenshuisen, it’s the first time since 1994, that the DA has a clear pathway into national government.

The Multi-Party Charter, which he says is the biggest bloc of opposition votes since 1994, is what they hope to use to secure the 50% -plus-one needed to take over the government.

He further added the DA can for the first time, with the assistance of its partners in the Multi-Party Charter, take over national and provincial governments.

Steenhuisen says the DA, with its proven track record, represents the best alternative to bring about a better life for all South Africans.

“On Wednesday, you will hold in your hand the pen that writes a new chapter for South Africa. But make no mistake about it: if DA voters stay at home, or if they split the vote among the long list of small parties on the ballot, our country’s next chapter could be even uglier than the last. If we sit back and allow a coalition between the ANC, the EFF and the MK Party – aided by sellouts like the Patriotic Alliance – our tomorrow will be far, far worse than our yesterday,” he says.

He also used the party’s final rally to lambast the National Health Insurance (NHI) Bill signed into law just over a week ago by President Cyril Ramaphosa.

He described it as a desperate electioneering stunt by the ANC aimed at manipulating voters.

According to him, the scheme will expropriate medical aid from the millions of South Africans, who have worked hard since 1994 to make it into the middle class.